World of Warcraft Classic: Four things that were good

08/29/201958


World of Warcraft: Classic is gearing up to launch, bringing the 15-year old WoW experience back into the limelight.Mmosky will share a few things I miss about Classic.which can be help for wow fans.
I miss the wider, more daunting, dangerous world


Although Blizzard has been working to reintroduce this experience in retail WoW, a combination of difficulty, reduced hand-holding, and PvP chaos made vanilla Azeroth a far more daunting, and therefor epic place to exist. In the story in modern WoW, your character is regarded as a hero of the Horde (or Alliance ... ahem). You mingle with kings and generals, destroy world-killing gods, and lay waste to entire armies. In vanilla, there was very much the sense that you were merely a soldier, part of a wider, more dangerous world.
The brain-dead leveling system that World of Warcraft has in its modern incarnation is completely unfun, and in desperate need of a full-blown revamp. Blizzard neutered it repeatedly in attempts to help veteran players skip more quickly to the end game with alternate characters, but the knock-on effect has been to eliminate the sense that, well, it's actually a game. Trying to engage newcomers to World of Warcraft is something Classic will have a far easier time with because you can actually die, there's some actual challenge. Shocking, I know.
The "world" in World of Warcraft is bigger than it has ever been, with various additional continents, dimensions, and planets to explore. Yet somehow, it feels smaller than WoW Classic. Again, additions like flying mounts, teleportation to practically anywhere, reduce the breadth of the universe. Classic forced you to walk basically everywhere until you were level 40 and then gave you a painfully slow mount in exchange for heaps of gold.
I miss the solid sense of progression

Retail World of Warcraft doesn't carry anywhere near the same sense of progression and prestige of vanilla, which is perhaps the biggest noteworthy difference among both versions of the game. When we killed heroic Azshara in retail after a week or so of attempts, nobody really cared. There was no cheering on voice comms and no real sense of achievement. The reason for this is hard to place, but if I had to guess, it's because Blizzard introduced four separate difficulty levels for bosses, from super easy mode, to easy mode, to medium mode, to hard mode. "Heroic" difficulty is probably best described as medium mode, but by that point you've probably already killed the same boss several times on easy mode, to farm better gear. It sucks the joy out of a boss kill, knowing that the next step of progress is doing it all over again with arbitrarily raised numbers.
In WoW Classic, there was one difficulty. If you couldn't do it, tough. And it was tough. When we killed Nefarian, a huge black dragon from vanilla, it was a moment of adulation for our guild. Modern WoW just doesn't really have that anymore, since boss battles have become so arbitrary-feeling.
I miss the interesting talent trees


In WoW Classic, there was one difficulty. If you couldn't do it, tough. And it was tough. When we killed Nefarian, a huge black dragon from vanilla, it was a moment of adulation for our guild. Modern WoW just doesn't really have that anymore, since boss battles have become so arbitrary-feeling.In vanilla, players were awarded a talent point for every level up, which they could spend in one of three trees representing different gameplay styles for their class. For example, a druid could choose between feral spec, which focuses on transforming into predatory animals for damage dealing and tanking, restoration for nature-inspired healing, or balance, calling on the heavens to deal ranged magical damage. Players could mix and match their points between specs, which led to some truly interesting combinations occasionally, but crucially, it also made leveling a lot more interesting, since you were getting some bits of progress every time you leveled up.
In retail WoW, every 15 levels you're granted a choice between one of three abilities instead. A lot of these abilities were either things classes used to have by default as part of their spec, or are often simply just weaker than other choices. When you get to choose between three, one of them will always produce the best results, making the others obsolete.
Classic's talent trees might have appeared to offer less choice in terms of abilities you could choose, but they were far more interesting in terms of progression, while also creating combo specs by going down two separate trees in some cases. The modern WoW talent panel simply gives you the illusion of choice.
I miss the close-knit sense of community


Perhaps the number one thing that Blizzard has screwed up in retail versus vanilla is the sense of community. Modern WoW introduced various match-making features such as "Looking for Raid" (LFR) and "Looking for Dungeon" (LFD), that auto-groups you with random players to tackle some of the end-game content. Problem is, random players don't co-ordinate and, frankly, often don't even respect each other, creating this weird hostile environment where nobody is really accountable. In response, Blizzard took an ax to the difficulty of dungeons and raids at this level, which also impacted the sense of accomplishment you get for beating content on harder difficulties.
Beyond the match-making features, Blizzard also does soft server merging, phasing players from other servers in and out of your own to ensure areas always feel populated. On the one hand, it's good that Blizzard ensures that low population realms always have players in them, but on the other, you never know if you're actually sharing a realm with the person in front of you.
Vanilla servers were fixed population realms, where everybody knew each other. Your reputation mattered because there were no APIs that allowed you to look up the player score on an external website. This created an environment where players were people, rather than tools to help you get loot. It was a far better environment for a social game like WoW.
The inclusion of LFR, LFD, and cross-realm play spelled the beginning of WoW's decline. It represents one of the central reasons people want Classic to return
Bonus: I'm looking forward to classic Alterac Valley

Alterac Valley (AV) was an MMO PvP experience like no other, and Blizzard is actually bringing it back to retail to celebrate the game's 15th anniversary.
A huge scale 40 vs. 40 action RPG combat scenario, taking place in a vast icy valley. Forty Horde players versus forty Alliance players, crashing in the middle on a frozen lake, in a huge war of attrition. The original Alterac Valley design featured NPC combatants as well, along with elite bosses that could roam around and create even more chaos.


The most epic thing about AV was the fact that, unlike today's version which has reinforcement tickets dwindling down over time, leading to a win, the original AV required players to push their way into the enemy's keep and kill their faction boss. This could create battles that lasted not hours, but days, with the same battles raging on after players had slept and returned. It also helped that the rewards for playing AV were excellent, granting one of the best two-handed maces you could get before raid-level gear. Some of my fondest memories of Classic involve that battleground, playing for hours and hours and hours in a non-stop epic war. Sublime.
15 years later, WoW Classic is still worth checking out.we have professional team to farm WOW classic gold through handwork and legitimate ways.when you want to buy WOW classic gold ,MMOSKY is your best choice.Welcome to contact us.

TAG: